What We See, What We Say, What We Believe

Culture is made up of three layers, represented here by an iceberg:

  • Behaviors, systems, policies and processes surrounding the way things are done
  • Ideals, goals, values, and aspirations set by leadership
  • Underlying assumptions that guide behavior

A leader’s influence on an organization and its culture can be subdivided into three general #culture types:

1. Constructive – encourage the attainment of organizational goals through people development; promote teamwork and synergy; and enhance individual, group, and organizational adaptability and effectiveness.

2. Aggressive/Defensive – lead people to focus on their own needs at the expense of those of their group and organization and lead to stress, turnover, and inconsistent performance.

3. Passive/Defensive – lead people to subordinate themselves to the organization, stifle creativity and initiative, and allow the organization to stagnate.

Sources: CultureIQ, HumanSynergisticsCircumplex

The Jungle of Chaos

jungle1

Do you ever get tired of navigating the jungle of chaos? Many say they do, but their behaviors, belief systems, and actions perpetuate a chaotic environment.

Human beings have an innate desire to feel valued and often go to great lengths to be seen and heard. Whether it’s exuding power or some other attention-seeking antic, at some point, it becomes taxing on the mind and spirit.

Everything in the jungle has a relationship and purpose. Many diverse forms of life have learned to coexist to fulfill this purpose. It would behoove us to take notice of the beauty that surrounds us versus taking extreme measures to create separation and inferiority. Don’t let your discomfort ruin the experience of others.

Everyone deserves to feel safe and comfortable, requiring us to look beyond our differences and finding the same value systems that underpin the way we engage as a community.

Kids Often Follow In Their Parents Footsteps

Parents help shape the world’s future by the way they shape their children’s values. Children learn values, morals, and priorities by observing how their parents act and react every day.

Consider the effects that abuse, alcoholism, selfishness, or greed has on a child. When children witness these negative traits, it becomes challenging getting through to them and redirecting their course.

If you sit in a room full of children and quietly observe, you may be surprised by what they say and how they behave. We may initially find humor in seeing our children repeat something we’ve said or done. When you acknowledge the behavior they emulate isn’t so cute anymore, the damage has already taken place.

It’s our job as parents to be the positive influence they need, so they, in turn, can pass down to their children the values we’ve instilled.