Commitment

Dear Leaders and Managers,

Are you committed to creating a culture of trust and collaboration?

If you answered yes, when was the last time you asked your team members:

✔ What are two to three things I can do differently to improve my leadership?

✔ How can I make our working relationship more effective?

✔ How are things going for you since we last spoke?

✔ What are the biggest challenges you’re facing?

✔ How can I support you?

✔ How’s the morale around you?

✔ How aligned do you feel with the company mission, vision, values?

✔ What is the most fulfilling aspect of your job?

✔ Are we providing enough growth opportunities for your role? If not, what’s missing?

✔ What’s something you want the C-Suite to know about you?

✔ What is one thing about our product or service you would improve?

We depend on people to help move our companies forward. When there is an absence of trust and collaboration, people are less willing to come together and often make disappointing progress.

It makes sense to have an authentic curiosity about the people we are delegating responsibilities to and to provide a safe environment to give/receive genuine constructive feedback.

When You Look For Trouble, It Will Rear Its Head

trouble

Sometimes curiosity can cause us to stumble. There are times when we dig for answers to only discover our suspicions were unfounded. The lack of trust revealed by taking such measures creates a divide that isn’t easily repairable.

No one likes to be accused of wrongdoing when they’re making every effort to do what’s right. Our past experiences or guilty conscience can cause us to be overly suspicious of others – questioning every move and second-guessing motives. While we should be cautious and wise in our dealings, we should not assume that every action is ill-intended.

On the other hand, you may have one thing in mind that you are searching for and happen upon other things not meant for you to see. Ultimately, you have to deal with the consequences of your actions.

Leadership

Many people want to be leaders, but the majority of us are followers. We may be good followers in following a good leader, but no leader is perfect. Many people fail to realize that leadership can appear glamorous at times, but it is often lonely, thankless, and sometimes filled with pressures to compromise values and standards.

The essential quality of leadership is credibility. If people don’t trust you, they won’t follow you. The most effective followers understand their role and follow the ideas and beliefs of their leader. However, if a leader goes against ethical practices, you must be willing to stand alone.

As we rise to leadership positions, our priorities should be finding productive ways to serve people versus our praise, prestige, and power. Although many seek recognition for their accomplishments through these channels, they are poor substitutes for the substance gained in serving someone other than ourselves.

Know Who Your Friends Are

In our fast-paced world, friends come and go, and circumstances change. Each can have a place in our lives in different ways. The friend you party with may not be the one you care to tell your deepest secrets.

Friendship is one of those areas full of hidden assumptions and unspoken rules. We only discover the value of our relationships when those assumptions clash.

Evidence of genuine friendship is loyalty and trust. Real friends give to and receive from each other. Fair-weather friends do not know the meaning of reciprocity. They take all we have to give, but we never see a return on our investment. We all need friends who listen, care and offer help when needed, in good times and bad.

Our friends can have a profound influence on us, often in subtle ways. Be mindful of whom you choose as your closest friends because you will surely grow to resemble each other.