Exaggerated Beliefs

Throughout our lives, we are encouraged to love ourselves, to understand our worth, to be more confident, etc. At what point does this turn into overestimating our capabilities in certain areas? 

Many people would describe themselves as above average in intelligence, driving, and a variety of other skills. This level of confidence could be beneficial when we need a boost to get through our day. But, what and who, are we using as our measuring stick to come up with these exaggerated beliefs? It can be challenging judging our competence when there is not a set standard or definition.

Imagine going on a job interview. Most likely, you’re going to say you have what it takes to get the job done. But, are you sure? Your level of performance will eventually be revealed.

Many people often believe that they are better at their jobs than their colleagues. Not only can this be annoying, but it can lead to disastrous results.

The opposite occurs for those with extensive knowledge. They assume that everyone else is knowledgeable too, and tend to underestimate their abilities.

We can compensate our self-perceptions by asking others for advice and constructive feedback, as well as training and educating ourselves in the areas where there are deficiencies.

Be Confident Within

We often struggle with new challenges due to a lack of self-confidence. It’s not unreasonable that you may have to work harder at something than another, but that doesn’t excuse you from trying. Many people like to take the easy way out and depend on superficial things to exude self-confidence like their physical appearance, material goods, and wealth. But, how you look and what you possess are all exterior.

Building self-confidence is a process that begins internally and grows into a pattern over time. It’s an attitude. Your perception of yourself will eventually bleed over to how others perceive you. Self-confidence affects every aspect of your life and typically stems from several sources: from within, others, and your achievements. Confidence is not about trying to do it all. It’s having realistic views of who you are and the approach you take to meet your overall goals.

Knowledge

Knowledge builds self-confidence and is the key to cracking life’s code. The more you learn, the more options you have in life.

Even if you never expand your formal education, there are opportunities to learn all around you.

There isn’t a day that goes by that you should not have learned at least one new thing, regardless of how insignificant it may seem.

When you reject learning, years of schooling will teach you little.

If you want to be enlightened, there is no end to what you can learn.

For knowledge to have real significance in your life, you must do something with what you’ve learned – teach others.

Holding on to knowledge for dear life defeats the purpose of why you learned something in the first place. Whether it’s teaching a child right from wrong or showing someone how to perform a specific task, you have a great gift that doesn’t cost you anything to share.