Mindset

Imagine riding down the highway knowingly exceeding the speed limit, and out of nowhere, a cop signals you to pull over. Do you immediately get upset? Do you offer up an excuse? Or, do you accept full responsibility for the speeding ticket the cop later hands you?

Now, let’s say the reason you were putting the pedal to the metal is that you were rushing to be on time for a meeting. You arrive at the meeting late, and human nature wants to provide a reason why. Depending on the audience, you may blame it on getting a ticket en route, or if you choose not to divulge your business, you may blame it on the traffic. Either way, the blame continues.

Blaming people or circumstances is easy. Taking responsibility, not so much. There is a saying that when you point the finger at others, three fingers point back at you.

When unfortunate events happen to you, how do you react? How does your mindset play into it?

A passive mindset is an assumption that life happens to you, and you’re not responsible.

An active mindset means you take ownership and are responsible for the things you control.

Adapted from FS (Farnam Street)

Practice Makes Perfect

Deliberate practice is a necessary ingredient for performing at your best.

The more effort you put into something, the better you become at it.

We are quick to give up on our relationships, professions, and personal growth because we can’t see beyond instant gratification.

Consider the athletes who must fully participate in a team practice when they’re not on the starting lineup. Practicing prepares them for the opportunity.

Those who perform at their best put in the work and take responsibility for their errors and mistakes.

Be observant of what you are doing, how you are doing it, and identify what can be adjusted to produce better results.

Whatever skills you lack, enhance them through training and consistent practice.

Recognize where a problem may exist, refine your skills, then try again.