Food For Thought Friday


💡 Managers make it run. Leaders make it better.

💡 How inspired are your followers?

💡 Use your strengths that benefit the team.

💡 Hire for their character.

💡 Set a goal to have fewer meetings.

💡 Develop the skill to communicate, and it will provide power to all that you do.

💡 Some will, some won’t, so what!

💡 Encourage your team to tell you what they think.

💡 See the potential in the team and give them the responsibility to use it.

💡 What should you be doing that you aren’t doing now?

Purposeful Leadership

Direction comes from what we do, but motivation comes from why we do it. Here are some ways to lead teams with purpose.

1. Explore to execute. Look inward. What inspires you to do what you do and how can you clearly articulate it?

2. Inspire to empower. Share your purpose with the company. Use it to motivate your team. Nothing drives people like passion.

3. Permeate to persevere. Infuse your purpose into every aspect of the business (internal messaging, policies, and practices), and align your team.

4. Unite to thrive. A team must work well with one another to be successful. If they believe in the same cause, they’ll better serve it.

5. Communicate to motivate. Go beyond describing the tasks you assign to explaining the meaning behind those tasks.

6. Trust to be trusted. Develop mutual respect through common beliefs and lead the company through respect, not fear.

7. Cultivate culture to curate success. Focus on achieving purposeful results, not the minutiae of strict procedures.

8. Reflect to grow. Every leader should continually reevaluate their words and actions to be as productive and purposeful as possible so that their team will follow.

9. Exemplify to enlighten. Lead by example.

Source: Forbes | Graphic: Thoughtful Leader

Trained or Transformed

There is a difference between trained leaders and leaders who are transformational. Here are five characteristics all transformational leaders possess:

1. They See Things Others Do Not See – While many leaders ask “Why?” they ask, “Why not?” because they’re always thinking about how they can create a better future.

2. They Say Things Others Do Not Say – Transformational leaders speak up. They leverage their influence by speaking bold words about a better future.

3. They Believe Things Others Do Not Believe – Adopting the belief that you can make a difference changes everything. When transformational leaders believe their cause can change things for the better, they bring conviction to their leadership

4. They Feel Things Others Do Not Feel – Passion is a leader’s energy. It creates momentum and tenacity for the challenges that all leaders face. Passion fires up leaders and the people they lead, and that fire carries them forward and helps them endure.

5. They Do Things Others Do Not Do – Transformational leaders know they exist for a reason, and they tap into that sense of purpose whenever fear arises.

Source: John C. Maxwell

Dare to be Different

Top Challenges for Future Leaders | by Jacob Morgan | Jacob Morgan | Medium

What makes a great leader in the 21st Century? The answer lies within these questions:

1. Where are you looking to anticipate change in your business and your life? Who are you spending your time with? What are you reading? What topics? How are you distilling this to understand potential discontinuities, and then doing something right now so that you are prepared and ready?

2. What is the diversity measure of your personal and professional stakeholder network? What is your capacity to develop relationships with people that are very different than you? Do they connect with you and trust you enough to cooperate with you in achieving a shared goal?

3. Are you courageous enough to abandon a practice that has made you successful in the past? The “go along to get along” attitude doesn’t work here. Great leaders dare to be different!

What makes a great leader today are the men and women who are preparing themselves not for the comfortable predictabilities of yesterday, but also for the realities of today, and all of the unknown possibilities of tomorrow.

Source: Roselinde Torres Ted.com

Leading Through Tension

Leading through tension isn’t fun. It requires us to challenge our team’s way of thinking, their attitudes, and their emotional responses. There is a relational shift from pleasing people to challenging people, and we have to manage people through this process.

One way is by using the 25-50-25 Principle of Change. Whenever we cast vision and challenge people to become part of achieving an endeavor, they tend to fall into one of three groups. Typically, 25% of the people will be all in, 50% will be undecided, and 25% will resist change. Our job as a leader is to help the middle 50 percent join the first 25 percent.

Here are some tips for doing that:

1. Understand that the resistant bottom 25 percent is not going to change no matter what we do.

2. Don’t waste effort trying to make the resistant 25 percent happy.

3. Don’t give the bottom 25 percent a platform or credibility.

4. Create opportunities for the middle 50 percent to spend time with the top 25 percent.

5. Ask the 25 percent who are all in, to help positively influence the 50 percent who are undecided.

6. Give the supportive 25 percent credibility and a platform to speak.

Reference: John C. Maxwell, Leadershift

Manage Time Better

Who can relate to these statements “manage time better,” “be more productive,” and “focus on what matters”? Mastering the art of time management requires saying no to something. If that doesn’t sit well with you emotionally, consider this, every time you say yes to something, you are simultaneously saying no to something else.

Here are some questions to ask yourself based on The Focus Funnel.

Eliminate – Can I live without it?
Automate – Can it be automated?
Delegate – Can it be done by someone else?
Procrastinate – Can it be done later?

Multiply your time by giving yourself the emotional permission to spend time on things today, that will give you more time tomorrow.

Source: Rory Vaden

Leadership

Many people want to be leaders, but the majority of us are followers. We may be good followers in following a good leader, but no leader is perfect. Many people fail to realize that leadership can appear glamorous at times, but it is often lonely, thankless, and sometimes filled with pressures to compromise values and standards.

The essential quality of leadership is credibility. If people don’t trust you, they won’t follow you. The most effective followers understand their role and follow the ideas and beliefs of their leader. However, if a leader goes against ethical practices, you must be willing to stand alone.

As we rise to leadership positions, our priorities should be finding productive ways to serve people versus our praise, prestige, and power. Although many seek recognition for their accomplishments through these channels, they are poor substitutes for the substance gained in serving someone other than ourselves.